September 1

a brief history of true conservatism

Over the past few centuries, the notions and flavors of conservatism and liberalism have become confused and conflated. The American Revolutionaries, for example, were contemporary liberals, while their adversaries the Tories (or British Loyalists) were conservatives. Today’s conservatives, on the other hand, embrace the American Revolutionaries, whereas today’s liberals probably would necessarily have embraced neither. Since these definitions have been lost in translation, this article will attempt to annotate a brief history of true conservatism and other similar and/or competing ideologies.

Classical liberalism was an 18th-19th century philosophy of general antipathy toward the state which argued for free markets, individual liberty, and natural law. “Liberal” in this historic definition is similar to “liberate” – from the Latin liberalis, “of freedom”. This ideology espoused rebellion against authoritarianism in the manner of John Locke, along with the total laissez-faire economics of Adam Smith. It held a general distrust of governments in light of historical erosions of civil liberties.

Conservatism (in the United States) is in practice a far cry from classical liberalism, though oratorically it is very similar. Mainstream modern conservatism pays lip service to the notion of limited, Constitutional government, but in fact many conservatives only espouse limited government in the areas they choose. Many of today’s so-called conservatives are now pro-big-military, pro-social-intervention, pro-power-state. This clearly contradicts the “limited government” rhetoric; whereas today’s liberals want big government for social programs, today’s conservatives want big government in other places.

Neoconservatism evolved as a result of progressives (Democrats) who, beginning in the 1970s and 80s, infiltrated the conservative (Republican) party in an attempt to shift it to the left on the political scale. Some of their main goals were increased foreign interventionism in defense of Israel and expansion of welfare programs, all in the name of conservatism. They were overwhelmingly successful. 9/11 was the spark that really lit the fire, when Bush declared that the United States should seek to promote liberal democracy around the world as cause for invading Iraq.

Paleoconservatism, on the other hand, is much more consistent on limited, Constitutional government. Paleoconservatives often tend to be religious and carry strong moral sentiments, but being aware of the “slippery slope” are more leery of advocating state intervention into many of these social and moral strata.

Libertarianism evolved as a contemporary approach to classical liberalism, and is sometimes called neo-classical liberalism or neoliberalism. This school of thought was revived by more modern intellectuals and Austrian economists such as Bastiat, Mises, Hayek, Rothbard, and Friedman. The term “libertarian” is typically associated with the United States, as similar movements around the world are known under different labels. It is characterized by a fundamental belief in liberty, and all its tenets flow from that point. Libertarians and paleoconservatives share a lot of common ground, but the former is antithetical to the latter’s preference for state-imposed social conservatism.

The Founding Fathers would be thought of at the time as classical liberals. In today’s terms, this would make them libertarian. Those who insist on invoking the Founding Fathers need to get consistent on their philosophy and embrace real libertarianism. Otherwise they are just regurgitating some flavor of neo- or faux conservatism. If only they knew what is often said and done in their name, the Founding Fathers would be rolling over in their individual (not collective) graves.

 more info

Many of these terms were also discussed in one of my previous posts, ideological definitions.

Recommended reading: dissertation on liberalism.

August 30

Rick Perry is a total fraud

The evidence keeps piling up, and it’s all pointing towards one simple fact: Rick Perry is a completely, totally fake conservative, through-and-through! What follows is a quick summary of Rick Perry’s blatant and all-encompassing anti-conservative history. Newest dirt first…

universal health care

That’s right, folks – in the newest addition to the Rick Perry Neocon Laundry List, we have a letter from Pointy-Boots Perry to then-First Lady Hillary Clinton in support of her healthcare task force. Hillary’s Task Force on National Health Care Reform was created to provide government-run universal health care. This alone should be proof enough that Rick Perry is just another Big Government Authoritarian… but this is just the beginning!

“Gardasil Rick”

Rick issued an executive order forcing all sixth-grade girls to take Gardasil shots.

Amnesty

Rick gets a D- on immigration.

TARP Bailouts

Rick supported the TARP bailouts.

TSA Bill

Rick killed the ‘Restrain The TSA’ bill.

Al Gore

Rick backed an already-climate-crusading Al Gore in ’88.

Bilderberg

Rick attends globalist Bilderberg meetings: Perry off to secret forum in Turkey. [alt]

 

Not to mention the questionable and would-be-hypocritical involvement with the La-Te-Da and Movie Gallery scandals. If you continue to support Rick Perry after being made fully aware of all these marks against him, you might want to question whether you yourself are a true conservative.

There is only one Republican Presidential candidate right now that has been a real, principled, consistent conservative for decades. His initials are RP and he is from Texas, but his name is NOT Rick Perry.

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October 22

ideological definitions

The following is a first stab at my definitions of ideological/political views in the United States today. I will probably update this with more information soon, or as I think of it. When debating on ideological/political issues, it is important to define your terms, which is why I’ve done so here.

conservatism: from the word “conserve”, meaning to keep to the self, the belief that government should be extremely limited and non-interventionist regarding both foreign policy and civil liberties, and if absolutely necessary, only to defend the individual’s rights from others; Austrian economy; a rebellion against statism. true conservatism in the modern age is represented as libertarianism, and historically as classical liberalism (“liberalism” being derived from “liberty”, which in this instance is a meaningful derivation). in its purest form, manifested as anarcho-capitalism or minarchy, depending on adherence to Lockean principles (ie social contract, or statism).

Conservatism: the general, modern-day majoritarian view of “conservatism”; currently, Republicanism, “the Right”, or neoconservatism. see also: Fox News

republicanism: of a republican form of government, or, defending the right of the minority from the will of the majority

Republicanism: see: neoconservatism

neoconservatism: a principally inconsistent jungle of legacied conservative rhetoric mixed with unfounded corporatism, warmongering, expedient welfare, general acceptance of established social programs i.e. public education, public transportation, etc., discrimination against harmless, non-aggressionist (but usually sinful) individuals (such as gays or drug users) based on dogmatic or sometimes skewed Christianity, and blind nationalism.

liberalism: from the word “liberal”, meaning radical (opposite conservative), the belief that government should help all of its citizens; a focus on social responsibility; Keynesian economy. liberalism in the modern age is also represented as progressivism, and historically as social liberalism and Fabian socialism. in its purest form, manifested as socialism or communism.

Liberalism: the general, modern-day majoritarian view of “liberalism”; currently, Democratism, “the Left”, or progressivism. see also: all mainstream media networks except Fox News

democratism: of a democratic form of government, or, forcing the will of the majority on the minority

Democratism: see: progressivism

progressivism: a principally inconsistent blend of liberal ideas warped with verbal environmentalism, atheism and evolution, feminism and anti-non-feminism/minoritism and anti-non-minoritism/nonconformity, absurd adherence to “political correctness”, and heavy push towards extreme statism.

popular politics: political views of the typical “Main Street” (everyday working-class people and small business owners), typically varied although most identify themselves with either the Republicans/Conservatives/Right or the Democrats/Liberals/Left, even if many of their views run independent of strict party affiliation

politician politics: political views of the typical Washington politician, mostly similar, just dramatized/accelerated at different lengths. politician Conservatism and politician Liberalism are parallel streets towards the East and West Ends of the city of Big Government.

populism: the political ideology that would help “Main Streeters” the most. most people would tend to think their own stance is the most populist, but the truth is, the most populist stance is MINE :)

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